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Relationships and COPD

Over the years, COPDers have asked if it's possible to have a relationship while having COPD. Actually, that's a question asked by people who suffer from all types of chronic illnesses.

Exploring diverse connections

Relationships can be family, spouses, friends, colleagues, classmates, and more. For certain individuals, relationships can transcend the ordinary and could potentially travel long distances.

These relationships might be part of a support system to help them cope with other people, too, those who have COPD or other diseases. A platonic relationship is a basic friendship that doesn't include sex or romance.

There might be a desire for an emotional bond. This type of bond goes beyond an actual friendship. There may be emotional feelings without an intimate, physical relationship.

Possibly, there is a desire for a physical relationship where they live in the other person's area. They could travel to visit each other. Possibly, one moves to be closer to the other.

Maybe they live hundreds or thousands of miles between them. Getting to know each other online or through the mail makes sense and is possibly safer, too. For some, there may be a sexual relationship. Others may get married.

I have known people in each of these relationships. Frequently, they begin as a friendships and that being part of their support group.

Deepening existing bonds

If you are already in a relationship, that is probably a good place to stay. Yet, other relationships may grow. Some of my closest friends came from the COPD sites.

I urge being safe before making huge life changes. Each of you needs to feel protected.

Talk to each other and communicate. If you are moving into a relationship, get to know each other. Ask questions about each other. What are the likes and dislikes?

Compatibility check

Do you follow the same paths, similar or not at all: beliefs, goals, values, lifestyles? If not the same, can you both get along with the differences?

Will religion, beliefs, politics, or anything else be something you can appreciate together, or each with your own leanings? It is important that you can live with and even tolerate the other person's choices.

Will family factor in at all? Sometimes, the two relationships can be important.

Check out each other's social media pages; it's another way to learn more about each other. The most important thing is sharing information about each other's health.

Having open communication

Do tell the other that you have COPD. Do you both have it? If not, share them about COPD. Let them know where you are. The stage you are at as well.

At some point, one might end up caring for the other. Possibly when you are sick, after a hospital visit, or as COPD or other progresses.

If you are feeling vulnerable, take your time. If you know us here, we don't diagnose nor practice medicine here.

So, if you have any questions or concerns, do call your doctor or talk to his/her nurse. They can advise you.

I am not trying to discourage you, or anyone else. From experience, I'm trying to bring awareness.

Having COPD, asthma, lung disease or another chronic illness, awareness can make a difference. You likely sense some thoughts or emotions in you. Be patient with others; they may be going through it with you.

Support people need someone who understands, too. We have articles and support for them here in our community.

Breathe-easy friends. Know that you aren't alone.

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The COPD.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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