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COPD Devices & Equipment

New on Oxygen

  • By BeeTx

    I got on oxygen last week and am curious to know if I am harming myself with or without.. A friend got all freaked when I got on it. My O2 sat % has been in the low 80s daytime and 70s or lower at night. She said I would become addicted to it and need more and more. I don’t think she has ever gone without air and doesn’t comprehend how it helps me feel a little better which is something.. Also was put on Ipratropium Bromide nebulizer medicine and albuterol rescue inhaler. All new to me!

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Hi Beetx and welcome to our community!
    Although we cannot provide medical advice (for your own safety), we have a lot of scientific information available her on COPD.net.
    However, the saturation levels you mention (70’s and 80’s) are generally considered to be very low. No doubt you are on oxygen because your health care provider recognized the need based on your diagnosis and blood work (low oxygen saturation). You will not become ‘addicted’ to oxygen. If your doctor feels the use of oxygen therapy will improve your breathing, that is sound therapy and it should help you feel more comfortable and less short of breath.
    You may find these articles on oxygen and oxygen therapy makes interesting reading.
    https://copd.net/?s=oxygen+therapy&submit=Go
    Please check back with us and let us know how you’re doing.
    Warm regards,
    Leon (site moderator)

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  • By Daniel Nester

    I am on a oxygen concentrator at night . My sat level drops below 64% while sleeping. Believe me BeeTx like Leon said it isn’t addicting. Just in case you do not know when your oxygen levels fall below 92% Your body doesn’t get enough oxygen to your brain and other very important organs in your body. Cells start dying. Most insurance companies start paying for it if your sats drop below 87% .It isn’t addicting it is important to function !If you need to be on it please do so! Thanks Leon for the site information . Being on oxygen can be a mentally emotional ride because you have to cope with the reality of having to be on it. The benefits far out weigh the out come with out it . Believe me I am there!

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Hi Daniel and thanks so very much for your insightful comments. We appreciate your own candor in sharing your experiences with our online community. Hopefully, other community members will see your post and derive benefit from reading about your own circumstances.
    Wishing you the best, Leon (site moderator)

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  • By carolcole

    I don’t know about the rest of you but, I read Just in case you do not know when your oxygen levels fall below 92% Your body doesn’t get enough oxygen to your brain and other very important organs in your body. Cells start dying. above this statement and it made me think. I can tell a big difference in myself since I have been on oxygen. One of the strangest ones is my finger nails.

    Yes I said finger nails. I use to have beautiful finger nails but, for the past three years they have been so, soft and would peel or layer and split and I could not get them to grow so, I was using fake nails. I have been on oxygen only for a month and a half and already I see white at the end of my nails. HOO RAH! They are growing again and feel strong. I had tried every product on the market and took minerals and vits. but, nothing worked till I got on oxygen. It was like magic.

    I figure if it made this big of a difference in my finger nails wonder what differences it is making inside me. WOW! This is getting exciting.

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    • By Lyn Harper, RRT Moderator

      carolcole – I don’t think I’ve heard of anyone else that’s had oxygen effect their nails. That’s wonderful! I’m very happy for you. Peeling, chipping nails can be so annoying. I agree with you – it makes you think it’s probably having other good effects that you haven’t even noticed yet; particulalry on your pulmonary system.

      Thanks so much for sharing that.

      Regards,
      Lyn (moderator)

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  • By carolcole

    One reason I got to thinking it was my oxygen that made the difference is because, a friend of mine told me a long time ago that her dr. looked at her nails one day and she asked him why. He told her that your nails can tell you a lot about a persons health. The color of the nail, the texture of the nail and etc. Well, since I had not done anything new other than the oxygen and I noticed the difference in my nails with in a month of starting the oxygen.

    That popped into my mind what the dr. had told my friend. Maybe it is true maybe not but, I am a believer now. lololol

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Glad to hear it, carolcole. I’m with Lyn on this one in that I have never heard of oxygen affecting the quality of nails either. I’m so glad to hear this is working for you in this way! As well, your comment about the difference the oxygen may be having on your insides as well! Keep up the good work!
    All the best,
    Leon (site moderator)

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  • By Dann

    MY wife is new on O2 and has to be on it 24/7 her levels are low 67 in the morning and doesnt get much above 81 during the day . We are on a 75 foot hose I read that we should only be o n no more than 50 ft will this make a big differance ?

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Hi Dann and thanks for your inquiry. While we cannot provide medical advice over the internet (for your own safety), your concern certainly warrants a comment. In the most general of terms, we usually suggest combining oxygen supply tubing so that it is no longer than 50 feet. That seems to work quite well for people and can be a bit more manageable in terms of controlling the excess tubing to prevent tripping over it.
    To be certain of your wife’s particular situation, I would urge you to take your concern up with the prescribing physician and/or the company that provides you with the equipment.
    Please do check back and let us know how your wife (and you) doing.
    All the best,
    Leon (site moderator)

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  • By Sam1

    Can Oxygen use relieve dyspnea?

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    • By Lyn Harper, RRT Moderator

      Yes, it can Sam1. If the dyspnea is occuring becuase of a lack of sufficient oxygen, the additional oxygen can help.

      Regards,
      Lyn (site moderator)

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  • By twovillages

    I was put on 2L if oxygen at night after an overnight oximeter study. I believe the study showed it fluctuated frequently, but only dropped down to a low of 84 infrequently. I wasn’t tested for sleep apnea, and wonder if I should ask about another type of test. I also wondered how they determine if I could have associated issues with retaining CO2 at night. I wake up feeling panic, and some SOB occasionally, but my oximeter will show saturation at 99%.

    I wonder if CO2 retention is common, and easily determined without an ABG done. We all try to stay mentally alert with this awful disease. Carefully monitoring oxygen saturation, and pushing physical exercise is really important with me.

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Hi twovillages – it sounds like you’re on the right track. After having the overnight oxygen study, it appears (from what you’ve said) the physician prescribed supplemental oxygen for you. That should certainly make you feel more comfortable as it should enable you to maintain oxygen saturation in a safe range.
    If you are looking for additional diagnostic testing, you may want to speak with your physician about pulmonary function testing and, as you mentioned, sleep apnea testing. You may find it helpful to review this article: https://copd.net/diagnosis/breathing-tests/.

    Carbon dioxide retention can be a characteristic of some types of COPD. It’s best diagnosed with blood gases. You may want to speak with your doctor about this as well. Remember, that shortness of breath (SOB) is one of the characteristic symptoms of COPD. You may find it helpful to look over this article as well: https://copd.net/symptoms/.

    All the best,
    Leon (site moderator)

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  • By dannelso

    You don’t become addicted..you need it

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    That is exactly correct, dannelso! Patients with COPD who have had supplemental oxygen therapy prescribed, require the oxygen to make them feel more comfortable. People do not become ‘addicted’ to oxygen, but rather need it to maintain the proper level of oxygen in the blood. All the best, Leon (site moderator)

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