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exercise

  • By BThomasson

    ‘Let’s Get Moving!

    You may think that because you have COPD, you shouldn’t exert yourself. But exercise has many payoffs, such as helping your body use oxygen better. Your doctor or pulmonary rehab team can help you design a workout plan and set goals, such as starting with a few minutes of exercise per day and working up to 30 to 60 minutes most days of the week. Once you get the green light, try these aerobic, strength, and flexibility exercises that are safe for people with COPD. Aim for a More Active Life

    Even if you don’t have time for a daily workout, look for opportunities to become more active. For instance, do a few stretches when you get up in the morning or while watching TV. Use the stairs instead of the elevator. Park farther away from store entrances. Rather than sitting in a movie, go to a park or Mall where you can walk around. Small bouts of activity add up over time!

    Reason 1: I get short of breath quickly. I can’t exercise long enough for it to do any good.
    Any exercise is better than none. You may be able to exercise for only a few minutes, but you will soon be able to add more. Remember to congratulate yourself for your efforts. Log your exercise so that you can see your progress.
    Reason 2: I am too tired.
    Strengthening your heart and lungs will help you feel less tired in the long run. Aerobic Exercise #1: Arms Up
    Sitting in a chair, hold a rolled towel or elastic band on your lap with both hands. Relax your shoulders and keep your back straight. Inhale. Exhaling through pursed lips, lift both arms to shoulder level. At the end of your exhale, inhale and return to starting position. As you continue to practice this exercise, try lifting your arms higher and higher until they’re able to go straight overhead.
    Aerobic Exercise #2: The Wave
    Sit in a chair. Inhale. As you exhale, lift both arms toward the ceiling. Wave your arms right and left until you’re done exhaling. Be careful not to twist your body as you do this. Inhale and return to starting position.
    Reason 3: I am too busy.
    Exercise can help slow the effects of COPD and the need for medical care and hospital stays. So every bit of exercise you do is an investment in your ability to do things you enjoy.
    Aerobic Exercise #3: Walking
    If you use a treadmill, be sure you learn how to use it correctly first. Whether you walk indoors or outdoors, choose a place with a flat surface. Start walking at a pace that’s comfortable for you, and remember to breathe while you walk. As your endurance improves, your doctor may recommend increasing your speed or adding an incline.
    Strength Exercise #1: Bicep Curl
    Stand or sit holding a light weight in each hand. Keeping your arms straight and at your sides with your palms facing forward, inhale. As you exhale, slowly bend your elbows and lift the weights to shoulder level. Inhale while you lower to your starting position. Ask your doctor or pulmonary rehab team how many you should do.
    Reason 4: Exercise is too much work.
    Exercise does take a lot of effort. But compare that effort to the option of getting sicker and weaker with COPD. Helping your body get more oxygen by exercising is a good way to decrease the frequency of headaches, sleep trouble and other COPD effects.
    Reason 5: I don’t like to exercise.
    Exercise doesn’t have to be tedious. In fact, experts say that people who do something they enjoy are much more likely to stick with it. You can garden, dance or walk and get great results.
    Strength Exercise #2: Side Lift
    Stand up straight and hold on to the back of a chair with one hand. Inhale. As you exhale, lift one foot to the side. Lift it only a few inches off the ground, and keep your toes pointing forward. Inhale and lower it back to your side. Repeat several times, and then do the exercise on the opposite side.
    Reason 6: I’m afraid to exercise.
    Talk openly with your doctor about your concerns. Ask what is safe for you and how to handle symptoms you have during exercise.
    Strength Exercise #3: Leg Raise
    Lie on the floor on your back. Bend one knee and place the sole of the foot flat on the floor. Keep the other leg straight out in front of you. Inhale. As you exhale, lift the straight leg until that knee lines up with your bent one. Inhale as you lower your leg. Repeat several times, and then switch legs. DO these exercises during a break sitting in your office chair! Sit Square with your back straight and your feet on the floor!
    Stretching Exercise #1: Shoulder Roll
    Stand with your hands on your hips or arms by your side—whichever is more comfortable. Relax your shoulders and inhale. As you exhale, slowly roll your shoulders in a circle going forward. At the end of your exhale, return to your starting position. Inhales, and this time, as you exhale, roll your shoulders in a circle going backward.
    Stretching Exercise #2: Calf Stretch
    Facing a wall, gently place the palms of your hands on the wall with elbows slightly bent. Be careful to use the wall only for balance; don’t push against it. Step your left foot a foot or two behind you. Keeping your toes pointing forward and your right knee slightly bent, gently lower your back heel toward the floor. You’ll feel the stretch in the back of your left calf. Hold for 15 to 30 seconds, remember to breathe, and return to starting position. Repeat the stretch with your right leg in back.
    Stretching Exercise #3: Quad Stretch
    Stand with the right side of your body facing a chair, and hold on to the back of the chair with your right hand for balance. Inhale. As you exhale, bend your left knee behind you and reach back to grasp your left ankle with your left hand. Gently pull so your knees line up while keeping your hips facing forward. You’ll feel a stretch in your left thigh. As you exhale, lower the foot to the floor. Repeat with the left leg several times, and then turn so you’re holding onto the chair with your left hand. Repeat the stretch with the right leg.’

    Medical Reviewer: Marcellin, Lindsey, MD; Fraser, Marianne, MSN, RNLast Annual Review Date: Jul 24, 2012Copyright: © Health Ink & Vitality Communications
    Reviewed by BJT 2013 July MLTC.

    reply
  • By BThomasson

    Energy Conservation and Work Simplification Techniques
    Principles of Energy Conservation
    Balance activity with rest
    Plan ahead
    Set priorities
    Pace activity
    Learn activity tolerance

    Principles of Work Simplification
    Slide, don’t lift
    Eliminate unnecessary motions
    Sit to work whenever possible
    Use proper work heights
    Avoid stooping, bending, and over-reaching
    Store supplies where used
    I. Self-Care
    Choose combs, brushes, etc. with large handles — they are easier to grip.
    Use pipe insulation from a hardware store, as it can be used to enlarge utensil handles.
    Put on a terry cloth bathrobe if you can’t dry your back.
    Use a bath brush for feet and back — get one with a long handle.
    If you have difficulty manipulating medication containers, ask your physician to write, “Do not put in child-proof container.”
    Ease toileting and bathing by using adapted bathroom, i.e., elevated commode, safety rails, tub bench, hand-held shower and grab bars.

    II. Clothing
    Select larger clothing than usual, as it is easier to put on and take off.
    Select clothing that opens in front and opens all the way so that you do not have to step into it.
    Select clothing with large flat buttons
    Difficulty with small fasteners? Adaptive equipment is available.
    Ease zipper manipulation by using a large paper clip or ring on zipper.
    Buy pants with elastic waistbands.
    Sore shoulder, hip? Put sore arm/leg in first and take out last.
    Use a long shoe horn if bending over is difficult or not allowed.

    III. Bathroom safety
    Most accidents occur in the home and a large majority of them occur in the bathroom. Assure safety with bathroom mobility by considering the following equipment.
    Grab bars in the bathtub as they are essential safety items for all.
    Non-skid strips in bottom of tub.
    Shower chair and hand held shower.
    Raised toilet seat and/or toilet safety rails, as they can provide additional support.

    IV. Cleaning
    Use tongs to pick up objects from the floor.
    Do not reach when using the dust mop.
    Use light weight, long handled tools.
    Use tea cart to transport cleaning equipment.
    When shower curtain gets dirty, throw it in the washing machine with a towel.
    Carry a light basket with all the cleaning supplies you need.
    Use a professional cleaning service occasionally.
    Put pail on a rolling dolly.

    V. Meal Planning, Preparation, Service, and Clean-Up
    Use surface appliances rather than a low oven when possible.
    Use fireplace matches to light gas oven.
    Gather all supplies and position them where they are to be used before starting the first step of the job.
    Use tea cart to transport heavy objects and to save steps.
    Slide filled pans along stove and counter tops instead of lifting them.
    Use a pull cart to bring food home from the supermarket rather than carrying shopping bags.
    Use an electric appliance when possible (i.e., blender, mixer, can opener, etc.)
    Use prepared mixes, frozen foods, or packaged foods.
    Plan one dish meals.
    Prepare extra portions for easy reheating later.
    Use light weight pots and pans with Teflon/Silverstone coating.
    Wear apron with pockets so that you can carry objects.
    Eliminate unnecessary steps:
    Let dishes drain dry
    Use paper dinner napkins instead of linen ones
    Use placemats instead of tablecloths
    Soak pots in hot water and detergent to eliminate vigorous scouring

    VI. Laundry
    Pin socks together before washing.
    Sort clothes on a table, never on the floor.
    Use sinks that are at a proper work height.
    Sit to iron.
    Use fabric softener to avoid wrinkles.
    Use three baskets to collect dirty clothes: to avoid sorting light, medium, and dark colors.
    Raise front loading washer/dryer on cinder blocks.

    VII. Communication
    Use book stand or music stand to hold books.
    Use large print books and magazines, or use a magnifying glass.
    Use writing aids with large handles (that are built up with firm tape).
    Use a card holder which is commercially available, or use a scrub brush.
    Ease telephone speaking by using a phone holder.

    VIII. Storage
    Store items where they are used.
    Use pull-out storage bins for vegetables, etc. to avoid reaching.
    Hang pots on wall, if dust is not a problem.
    Install pull-out or swing-out shelving.
    Keep measuring utensils in containers where they are used.

    IX. Shopping
    Call department store ahead of time and reserve a wheelchair.
    Call ahead and make sure items you want are available.
    Keep memo pad and pencil in all rooms to keep shopping list up to date.
    Shop at non-peak hours.
    Have grocery store deliver groceries.

    X. Correct Body Mechanics Save Energy
    Sit and stand correctly by using good posture.
    Lift with your legs while keeping your back straight.
    Avoid reaching.
    Push, don’t pull.
    Use both hands to carry items when possible.
    Slide, don’t lift.
    Hold objects close to your body when carrying.

    XI. Pace
    Work and move at a moderate pace.
    Fast walking takes 1-1/2 times as much energy as slow walking.
    Walking up stairs takes 7 times as much energy as walking on level ground.
    Take frequent short rest periods while you are walking to avoid getting tired, instead of a long rest period after you get tired.
    Use slow, flowing motions rather than fast, jerky movements.
    Plan ahead to avoid rushing. This allows you to work at a relaxed pace.
    Alternate light and heavy work throughout the day and week.
    Avoid sudden bursts of activity.

    XII. Work Heights
    Use work surfaces that are at a level that allows you to work without bending or raising your hand above the elbow.
    Adapt counter space or use a lapboard for wheelchair patients.
    Order desk arms on a wheelchair to allow an individual access to appropriate tables.

    Safe and Easy Ways to do Housework
    While managing huge amount of household tasks, people may sometimes feel difficult to cope and may injure themselves when performing housework. If people know the energy conservation and joint protection techniques, they may enjoy the pleasure of doing housework as well as minimize the chance of getting injured at work. Below are some tips to safer and more efficient ways to manage household tasks.
    Proper positioning
    • When performing household tasks in the standing position, place one foot in front of the other to keep your balance. Avoid squatting and kneeling during work.
    • Use long-handle mops or brooms to clean the floor so as to avoid having to bend the trunk and strain the spine.
    • Slightly bend the knees and tuck in your tummy before picking up heavy loads. Hold the load close to your body. Keep your back straight and tighten your abdominal muscle to support the spine. Stand with feet apart at shoulders’ width and avoid excessive knee bending so as to keep your balance.
    Joint protection
    • Avoid over-loading the joints during housework. For example, avoid using the same joint repetitively or carrying heavy loads. Otherwise the soft tissues of the joints could be damaged easily.
    • Remember to do stretching exercises daily to keep the joints flexible and strengthen the muscles. It will also help to protect against injury.
    Energy Conservation
    • Simplify work procedures and use different ways to save energy while doing daily housework. For example, you can sit down to do work like ironing, folding clothes and meal preparation etc.
    • Use suitable assistive devices to simplify the work procedures. For example, use non-stick cooking utensils to minimize the effort needed to clean them. Use electrical blender and micro-wave oven to shorten the time of food preparation. Use vacuum cleaner or magician wiper with long-handled design to clean the floor to avoid the need to bend down.
    • Avoid prolonged working and take a break between work procedures. After prolonged standing, sit down to do some light work. This can let you take a rest and relax.
    Understand your own limits
    • Know your limitations. Do not commit beyond your capability. For example, in helping to take care of young children.
    • If needed, ask family members for help or seek help from community resources nearby. For example, home helper service, voluntary services.
    Good Planning
    • Prepare a shopping list in advance to avoid extra trips. Plan ahead before you do the housework in order to do it efficiently.
    • Put frequently used items in places where they can be reached conveniently. This can save energy and improve efficiency.
    • Check the home environment and clear up clutter regularly to avoid the heavy workload during the annual cleansing before the Lunar New Year.
    Stress Management
    • If you feel stressful in managing household tasks, reconsider the standard set: is it too high? Set a more realistic time schedule to finish the housework.
    • Share with your friends and learn some relaxation methods.
    In summary, you can plan ahead, set priorities, and perform light and heavy tasks alternately. Know your limits, manage housework flexibly, and make better use of the community resources to help in finishing housework more efficiently and safely.
    Bjt-2013

    reply
  • By BThomasson

    Energy Conservation and Work Simplification Techniques
    Principles of Energy Conservation
    Balance activity with rest
    Plan ahead
    Set priorities
    Pace activity
    Learn activity tolerance

    Principles of Work Simplification
    Slide, don’t lift
    Eliminate unnecessary motions
    Sit to work whenever possible
    Use proper work heights
    Avoid stooping, bending, and over-reaching
    Store supplies where used
    I. Self-Care
    Choose combs, brushes, etc. with large handles — they are easier to grip.
    Use pipe insulation from a hardware store, as it can be used to enlarge utensil handles.
    Put on a terry cloth bathrobe if you can’t dry your back.
    Use a bath brush for feet and back — get one with a long handle.
    If you have difficulty manipulating medication containers, ask your physician to write, “Do not put in child-proof container.”
    Ease toileting and bathing by using adapted bathroom, i.e., elevated commode, safety rails, tub bench, hand-held shower and grab bars.

    II. Clothing
    Select larger clothing than usual, as it is easier to put on and take off.
    Select clothing that opens in front and opens all the way so that you do not have to step into it.
    Select clothing with large flat buttons
    Difficulty with small fasteners? Adaptive equipment is available.
    Ease zipper manipulation by using a large paper clip or ring on zipper.
    Buy pants with elastic waistbands.
    Sore shoulder, hip? Put sore arm/leg in first and take out last.
    Use a long shoe horn if bending over is difficult or not allowed.

    III. Bathroom safety
    Most accidents occur in the home and a large majority of them occur in the bathroom. Assure safety with bathroom mobility by considering the following equipment.
    Grab bars in the bathtub as they are essential safety items for all.
    Non-skid strips in bottom of tub.
    Shower chair and hand held shower.
    Raised toilet seat and/or toilet safety rails, as they can provide additional support.

    IV. Cleaning
    Use tongs to pick up objects from the floor.
    Do not reach when using the dust mop.
    Use light weight, long handled tools.
    Use tea cart to transport cleaning equipment.
    When shower curtain gets dirty, throw it in the washing machine with a towel.
    Carry a light basket with all the cleaning supplies you need.
    Use a professional cleaning service occasionally.
    Put pail on a rolling dolly.

    V. Meal Planning, Preparation, Service, and Clean-Up
    Use surface appliances rather than a low oven when possible.
    Use fireplace matches to light gas oven.
    Gather all supplies and position them where they are to be used before starting the first step of the job.
    Use tea cart to transport heavy objects and to save steps.
    Slide filled pans along stove and counter tops instead of lifting them.
    Use a pull cart to bring food home from the supermarket rather than carrying shopping bags.
    Use an electric appliance when possible (i.e., blender, mixer, can opener, etc.)
    Use prepared mixes, frozen foods, or packaged foods.
    Plan one dish meals.
    Prepare extra portions for easy reheating later.
    Use light weight pots and pans with Teflon/Silverstone coating.
    Wear apron with pockets so that you can carry objects.
    Eliminate unnecessary steps:
    Let dishes drain dry
    Use paper dinner napkins instead of linen ones
    Use placemats instead of tablecloths
    Soak pots in hot water and detergent to eliminate vigorous scouring

    VI. Laundry
    Pin socks together before washing.
    Sort clothes on a table, never on the floor.
    Use sinks that are at a proper work height.
    Sit to iron.
    Use fabric softener to avoid wrinkles.
    Use three baskets to collect dirty clothes: to avoid sorting light, medium, and dark colors.
    Raise front loading washer/dryer on cinder blocks.

    VII. Communication
    Use book stand or music stand to hold books.
    Use large print books and magazines, or use a magnifying glass.
    Use writing aids with large handles (that are built up with firm tape).
    Use a card holder which is commercially available, or use a scrub brush.
    Ease telephone speaking by using a phone holder.

    VIII. Storage
    Store items where they are used.
    Use pull-out storage bins for vegetables, etc. to avoid reaching.
    Hang pots on wall, if dust is not a problem.
    Install pull-out or swing-out shelving.
    Keep measuring utensils in containers where they are used.

    IX. Shopping
    Call department store ahead of time and reserve a wheelchair.
    Call ahead and make sure items you want are available.
    Keep memo pad and pencil in all rooms to keep shopping list up to date.
    Shop at non-peak hours.
    Have grocery store deliver groceries.

    X. Correct Body Mechanics Save Energy
    Sit and stand correctly by using good posture.
    Lift with your legs while keeping your back straight.
    Avoid reaching.
    Push, don’t pull.
    Use both hands to carry items when possible.
    Slide, don’t lift.
    Hold objects close to your body when carrying.

    XI. Pace
    Work and move at a moderate pace.
    Fast walking takes 1-1/2 times as much energy as slow walking.
    Walking up stairs takes 7 times as much energy as walking on level ground.
    Take frequent short rest periods while you are walking to avoid getting tired, instead of a long rest period after you get tired.
    Use slow, flowing motions rather than fast, jerky movements.
    Plan ahead to avoid rushing. This allows you to work at a relaxed pace.
    Alternate light and heavy work throughout the day and week.
    Avoid sudden bursts of activity.

    XII. Work Heights
    Use work surfaces that are at a level that allows you to work without bending or raising your hand above the elbow.
    Adapt counter space or use a lapboard for wheelchair patients.
    Order desk arms on a wheelchair to allow an individual access to appropriate tables.

    Safe and Easy Ways to do Housework
    While managing huge amount of household tasks, people may sometimes feel difficult to cope and may injure themselves when performing housework. If people know the energy conservation and joint protection techniques, they may enjoy the pleasure of doing housework as well as minimize the chance of getting injured at work. Below are some tips to safer and more efficient ways to manage household tasks.
    Proper positioning
    • When performing household tasks in the standing position, place one foot in front of the other to keep your balance. Avoid squatting and kneeling during work.
    • Use long-handle mops or brooms to clean the floor so as to avoid having to bend the trunk and strain the spine.
    • Slightly bend the knees and tuck in your tummy before picking up heavy loads. Hold the load close to your body. Keep your back straight and tighten your abdominal muscle to support the spine. Stand with feet apart at shoulders’ width and avoid excessive knee bending so as to keep your balance.
    Joint protection
    • Avoid over-loading the joints during housework. For example, avoid using the same joint repetitively or carrying heavy loads. Otherwise the soft tissues of the joints could be damaged easily.
    • Remember to do stretching exercises daily to keep the joints flexible and strengthen the muscles. It will also help to protect against injury.
    Energy Conservation
    • Simplify work procedures and use different ways to save energy while doing daily housework. For example, you can sit down to do work like ironing, folding clothes and meal preparation etc.
    • Use suitable assistive devices to simplify the work procedures. For example, use non-stick cooking utensils to minimize the effort needed to clean them. Use electrical blender and micro-wave oven to shorten the time of food preparation. Use vacuum cleaner or magician wiper with long-handled design to clean the floor to avoid the need to bend down.
    • Avoid prolonged working and take a break between work procedures. After prolonged standing, sit down to do some light work. This can let you take a rest and relax.
    Understand your own limits
    • Know your limitations. Do not commit beyond your capability. For example, in helping to take care of young children.
    • If needed, ask family members for help or seek help from community resources nearby. For example, home helper service, voluntary services.
    Good Planning
    • Prepare a shopping list in advance to avoid extra trips. Plan ahead before you do the housework in order to do it efficiently.
    • Put frequently used items in places where they can be reached conveniently. This can save energy and improve efficiency.
    • Check the home environment and clear up clutter regularly to avoid the heavy workload during the annual cleansing before the Lunar New Year.
    Stress Management
    • If you feel stressful in managing household tasks, reconsider the standard set: is it too high? Set a more realistic time schedule to finish the housework.
    • Share with your friends and learn some relaxation methods.
    In summary, you can plan ahead, set priorities, and perform light and heavy tasks alternately. Know your limits, manage housework flexibly, and make better use of the community resources to help in finishing housework more efficiently and safely.
    Bjt-2013

    reply
  • By Erin Rush Moderator

    Thanks for sharing all this great information, BThomasson! We appreciate you taking the time to post this in our forums. You shared a lot of great information and tips in your posts. Thank you again! We’re glad to have you here. Best, Erin, COPD.net Team Member.

    reply
  • By Janet Plank Moderator

    BThommason you shared alot of good information. Exercise is so very important. Thank you!

    Janet (moderator)

    reply