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Exercise & Activity

COPD and Exercise must go hand in hand.

  • By probbo

    We all know how important Exercise is to us having COPD. If you are not doing any then now is the time to think about doing it. Dont just sit there and think that I Have This Illness So What. Wrong attitude as quite alot of us will agree.
    I myself try to stay as fit as I can. I try to walk as much as I can no more going to shops just up the street were i live in the car. It may take me a while to get there and back but it gives me some of the exercise that I need.
    I also try and go to the swimming baths twice a week.
    I am presently awaiting to go back to Pulmonary Rehabilitation. Our Physio team were not happy for me participating because I have severe Blood pressure problems. ( now beeing checked for possibly having PAH).
    So for those off us not doing any form of exercise I will put it to you to get off your butts and do some it is important that we do.
    Do not give into your COPD.

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  • By Shary

    I try to get out for walks and use my weights for my arm, also have a stationary bike. But it is so hard, being short of breath the whole time. I really have to make myself do it because it is so uncomfortable. wish I had the room for a treadmill, cause its so cold lately.

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  • By probbo

    Sharry. It is good that you are trying to keep ontop of your COPD. Just remember to drink plenty and rest, do not over exert yourself. I made that mistake trying to think i could do more than i was doing and in the end i ended up being on my back on oxygen.

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  • By easy

    Welcome!
    I wrote a while ago, but I read a lot from your writings.
    Yesterday I was hiking with colleagues. I think we walked between 3000 and 3500 meters. Anxiety made the walk a bit harder, and rain had fallen, but I did it with my 43% lung. When I was tired, I stopped a bit, but it was not full of rest. Yet, I did it all along!
    Sometimes panic is more difficult to handle than shortness of breath. There is a trembling here, which is like a day without sleep.
    Will I still know how to walk normally? Every day I practice home, I walk for 45 minutes in the apartment, garden … but if I need to go out, it’s much, much harder.
    It also makes it difficult for me to know when and how my condition will deteriorate.When it’s harder for a day, I’m scared.
    I read here a lot that they can work for decades ….
    I wish you a lot of breath and a light breath!
    easy

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Hi easy and thanks so much for sharing your recent experiences with COPD. It sounds (to me) like you’re doing beautifully – walking as much as you are able and keeping at it. Walking every day (as you stated, 45 minutes in the apartment and the garden) is a wonderful way to build up and maintain your stamina and physical condition.

    It’s certainly not uncommon to have anxiety and concern about your condition and what the future holds. The right outlook, attitude and physical approach that you are described go a long way towards successfully coping with COPD.

    We’re glad to have you as part of our online community and look forward to your continued participation here.
    All the best,
    Leon (site moderator)

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  • By easy

    Dear Leon, thank you for the encouragement.
    I wish you a happy easter!

    I wish you all the best

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Thank you, easy! And the very same to you too. I hope you had a good holiday.
    Warmly,
    Leon

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  • By Deemiles

    Pulmonary Rehab is the best thing I’ve done. My FEV is 44. Not only is the guided exercise helpful but the information has been eye-opening. I was very distressed if my O2 dropped below 90, and if it went to 84 I immediately added supplemental oxygen. This was totally unnecessary for me and it was actually making me more dependent on the supplemental oxygen. Now when my O2 drops into the 80’s I simply stop and breathe until it comes up (which doesn’t take long). I am back to being my old, active self!!! So, I encourage all of you to talk to your pulmonologist, or a rehab therapist to see if you’re being held back by fear…I was.

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    • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

      Hi Deemiles and thanks for sharing your extremely positive and successful experiences with pulmonary rehabilitation. The progress you’ve made will no doubt inspire others in our community to look into pulmonary rehab for themselves.
      Keep up the good work!
      Leon (site moderator)

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  • By Janet Plank Moderator

    Reading this, I am hearing so much encouragement and inspiration from each of you. Exercise and rehab can make such a difference. Thank you for sharing your post and hopefully this will encourage and educate others to do the same.

    Have a breathe-easy day/night!
    Janet (site moderator)

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  • By easy

    Hi, Two weeks ago I was on a one-year check. My medicine was not very helpful. One year ago, 37% of the fev1 improved from the drug to 43%. But two weeks ago, 26.8%. Is it so bad that I train, walk, do everything I do? Or may the result fluctuate? I just got another drug, but my mood was worse than a year ago. Will this be better at some time? 🙁

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Hi easy and thanks for your post. It sounds like your condition has fluctuated during your first year, based on the details you shared (above). Are you currently (and for the past year) under a physician’s care? With proper assessment, treatment and a prescribed medication regimen, I would hope the physician can bring you to a point that is a little more consistent than what you’ve described. You may want to discuss this at length with your prescribing physician. Please do check back and let us know how you’re doing.
    All the best,
    Leon (site moderator)

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    • By easy

      Dear Leon, I received a notice that twice what I wrote was published. I’m sorry, my computer had something wrong, the compiler did not work perfectly.

      Thank you for your reply. The doctor who started the treatment is no longer, my new doctor needs to go back in September. But my temper is very messy, I’m constantly anxious, panicked. Doctors do not usually say much, and I feel they only experiment. I’ll tell you the rest. Sincerely, I wish you a good breath!
      easy

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    • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

      Hi easy and thanks for your prompt reply. Please, do not fret about the duplicate postings. We just wanted to make certain you were aware of it – sometimes people take a while to get used to the website. Clearly, this isn’t the case for you since you explained about your computer mishap. As is said – ‘no worries!’ at all!!

      We appreciate what you’ve said about the two doctors you have been dealing with. If you have lost confidence in them, you may want to seek out a more compassionate physician – one who can manage you completely, including the temper and anxiety you expressed concerns over.
      We are here to assist in any way that we can.
      Wishing you well,
      Leon (site moderator)

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  • By claude

    would a fit bit help in keeping track of walking?

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  • By Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT Moderator

    Hi claude and thanks for your post. There is no question that a ‘fit bit’ type watch (there are many clones out there, now!) will help you to track your walking. I see these in use all the time. In fact, I have one myself and have been using it for almost 2 years. Is this how you plan on tracking your activity? Please check back and let us know how you’re doing.
    All the best,
    Leon (site moderator)

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