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How to prevent face lines from oxygen tubes?

I recently started using oxygen at night and when I wake up in the morning I have lines embedded in my cheeks from the oxygen tubes. I sleep on my sides and roll over several times at night, and the lines from tubes take several hours to go away in the morning. Anyone else have this problem and found a way to prevent them?


Community Answers
  • ASAP815
    9 months ago

    Hi Chrisptx ~ the only way I have found to avoid the lines on my face is to sleep on my back so the tubing doesn’t press into my face! Wishing you all the best on this journey!

  • Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT moderator
    9 months ago

    Hi ASAP815 and thanks for your input and for sharing what works for you regarding this situation. We appreciate your participation in this conversation. All the best, Leon (site moderator)

  • chrisptx author
    9 months ago

    Thank you for all of your comments, Leon. I’m glad I found this group to talk about COPD related things.

  • Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT moderator
    9 months ago

    Hi again, chrisptx and it’s our pleasure. We’re glad to have you as part of our online community. You may also want to check out our COPD Facebook page. So many of our members use that venue to discuss all aspects of their condition with one another. The COPD.net moderators and team members are there too. Do you think you might want to try that, too? Warm regards, Leon (site moderator)

  • chrisptx author
    9 months ago

    I use the first method and the small hoses going from the cannula to the top of each ear are the ones making the lines on my face.

  • Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT moderator
    9 months ago

    Hi again, Crisptx, and thanks for the explanation. On occasion, over the years, I’ve had patients in the hospital setting (and home care, as well), express similar concerns with the tubing running over the ears. What we then do is use little 4 x 4 gauze pads and improvise a protective barrier over the affected skin by cushioning the tubing at the point of contact. How does that sound to you as a remedy? Did you want to try that?
    It may be worth a shot…
    Regards,
    Leon (site moderator)

  • Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT moderator
    9 months ago

    Hi chrisptx – when it comes to using tape – that’s a decision you’ll have to make for yourself. Some people have issues with their skin being irritated by various types of tape. Sometimes ‘paper tape’ or ‘silk tape’ can be less abrasive for sensitive skin. It all depends on you, in your own situation. I hope this answer helps you. Leon (site moderator)

  • chrisptx author
    9 months ago

    Yes, I’m going to give that a try. Do you use any tape to keep the gauze in place?

  • Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT moderator
    9 months ago

    Hi chrisptx and thanks for your post. This can be a common problem for which I can think of two suggestions.
    1. If the nasal cannula is applied according to the directions, the prongs of the cannula are inserted into the nares (naturally), and then the hose is draped around the ears and secured under the chin. In this installation style, the hose is not traversing the cheeks.
    2. If you are utilizing another application method in which the hose runs across the cheek(s), you may want to insert a soft tissue/cotton/gauze pad between the hose and your cheeks. That might alleviate the ‘face lines’ you described.
    Perhaps other community members may be able to relate their experiences with your expressed concerns.
    I hope this provides you with some ideas for ameliorating your issue.
    Leon (site moderator)

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