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Bits & Pieces – Part 2

Check out Part 1 of this series, Bits & Pieces.

My wife has a tremendous “junk drawer” in the kitchen. I’m not certain where that phrase comes from. Does anyone know? I think most folks had one at some point in their lives and may have one now, no?

Stuff in a bottomless pit

My mom had one in our kitchen when we were growing up. The difference between hers and ours is that the house I grew up in was over 100 hundred years old and the drawers were large and deep. So you can get an idea of how much stuff could be contained in such a bottomless pit.

The one in our kitchen now is nowhere nearly as big. In any event, there’s the stuff that comes across my path when I think about COPD but doesn’t really fit neatly in one article anyway. So, these will be short shots – just thoughts about that stuff! Kind of like finding good stuff in the junk drawer.

Acidophilus for the stomach

Acidophilus – for the stomach. I don’t know about you but every so often I get a stomachache – not the kind that you got when you were a kid but more like actual, sharp, stabbing pain across my midsection. They’re not continuous or anything. But they seem to be related to breathing and lung displacement.

Many of us have lungs that have “moved” since COPD became part of our lives, and we find that this causes extreme discomfort at times. It’s the kind of thing that seems to come and go. In any event, acidophilus seems to help tremendously and quickly. The pain abates pretty fast and if you take 2 of the chewable tablets every day as I do, you find that it also acts as a terrific laxative. For many years I drank powdered fiber, but chewable acidophilus is like a miracle drug.

Green oxygen tubing

We have 2 huskies and my 80-year-old mother-in-law lives with us! That sounds odd – I know. But when I first started using oxygen from a concentrator, I used two clear 20-foot pieces of tubing. The length was meant to reach around the first floor of the house as much as possible. But it also meant that it would cause an obstacle for Mom, Sadie, and Mia.

Right away, there was tripping and growling (Mom tripped – the dogs growled). I realized that part of the problem was Mom’s advanced eyesight, but I wasn’t sure why “the girls” as we call them, couldn’t see the tubing.

“Green tubing” my buddy, Richie, who is an ophthalmologist said to me.

“Because of the dogs?” I asked.

“Them and your mother-in-law,” Richie said. “I won’t get into the details of it but it’s a depth perception thing with older folks and clear tubing.”

“And the dogs?” I asked.

“Who knows?” he answered honestly.

But it works – for both!

Skin wounds and bruises

I take a steroid in my inhaler. As a result, my skin is prone to bruise more easily. I’m a klutz so I keep banging up my arms and legs and getting these abrasions. Luckily, there’s a number of good “wound care” products on the market and most offer a “wound irrigation and management solution.”

I think it is important that whatever you choose contains “Hypochlorous” in its ingredients. I use Puracyn plus, Wound and Skin Cleaner. These kinds of wound care solutions don’t perform miracles by any means. But they certainly help clear things up faster than if you let nature take its course.

Long-sleeved t-shirts

Oftentimes (for me at least) they take forever to heal, especially if I have to use my inhaler as prescribed. I only wished I had known about this sooner. I had taken to wearing long-sleeved t-shirts even on the hottest of days because the bruises were embarrassing.

Now I think I’m gonna go back to my COPD “junk drawer” and see what else I can find!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The COPD.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Janet Plank moderator
    3 weeks ago

    I’ve used Acidophilus for thrush as well. Taking it regularly would help rid thrush. This was not told by any medical personnel. A friend told me about this. It’s good to know how it worked for you.

    Junk drawers live up to their names and reputations. I had oh, have one that started with my trinkets, a couple of screwdrivers, a scissors and small hammer. Junk has named this drawer properly. My husband has taken over some of my drawer.

    Very good and fun article.
    Janet (site moderator)

  • KevinDavitt moderator author
    3 weeks ago

    Thanks Janet.

  • Leon Lebowitz, BA, RRT moderator
    3 weeks ago

    Hey Kevin – this is a great supplement to the first part of this topic – makes very good and very practical reading.
    For what it’s worth (COPD aside), my wife also has a cool junk drawer – it’s in our dining room, and has proved to be invaluable over the years – same as what you’ve shared with the community.

    Thanks for the article!
    Always,
    Leon (site moderator COPD.net)

  • KevinDavitt moderator author
    3 weeks ago

    A pleasure my friend!

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