Man cutting a woman

What A Difference A Haircut Makes

Having a chronic illness, such as COPD, sometimes leaves a person feeling down. It’s understandable. Chronic illnesses can affect us. This COPD or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, often reminds a person that he/she has had to give up so many things that they enjoyed. For some, this loss feels like they are giving up part of their identities, things that they have enjoyed, things that helped to make them who they are today. It’s wrong to tell them not to feel that way. It doesn’t help them to feel better and possibly only helps to make them feel abandoned, alone. Some are grieving the loss of their old life.

Finding things that make us feel better

Sometimes, what’s needed is to find something that helps to make us feel better. It may be difficult to do, yet it may bring a smile and a memory of something that comes to mind.

What a difference these things can make

A haircut

What a difference a haircut makes. I’m unable to use gels or sprays, so my hair tends to turn electric! It definitely doesn’t look better as it gets longer. Then comes the day, my haircut day. My hairdresser cuts it short, like usual. It’s so easy to care for. Sure, we can still see marks and lines where my c-pap straps are and it has given me a cowlick. It’s okay though. It feels so good! I would say it feels as good inside and out.

A hug

What a difference a grandchild’s hug makes. That makes me smile inside and out, because it reaches my core, that hug touches my heart and lives on in my memories.

Sharing online

What a difference sharing an online smile or a gif makes. When posting on a friend or acquaintance’s Facebook or Instagram site, makes a body feel good. Doing even little things to pick others up, and often ourselves too…

Writing

What a difference writing this article makes. It’s a good feeling to share things that I have found helps me, that hopefully brings smiles for others, as well as myself.

Do you have something that makes a difference?

These can make me/ us feel good physically, because having short hair is easier. I would say that some of these touch our emotional health. Sometimes it’s very difficult to find ways to get out of the rut that can bring or even keep a person down. Some things do bring me down, so it takes a bit to rethink my negative or down feelings. I’m not sure how it affects each of you.

With me, it’s important to find something good in things, and in my days. There are plenty of things that are wrong. Those who know me, know that I struggle, and my kids have told me that I preach my “feel good things”. But hey, for me it works. For others maybe not. So that’s one area where it’s important to agree to disagree. It’s important for each of us to realize that we don’t need to argue about who’s right or wrong, our friendship or love can be much more important. By agreeing to agree to disagree frees each of us from having to be right or wrong. What a difference agreeing to disagree makes.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The COPD.net team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (4)
  • pat02
    3 weeks ago

    Janet, thank you for sharing this article, I remember well the day my daughter had her hairdresser come to my house and cut my very long hair. I was overjoyed and actually cried it felt wonderful. I just kept praising the young lady until my daughter started to laugh. She was so afraid I wouldn’t be happy with very short hair, boy was she wrong.
    There is not much I can do now but hugs from my grand children and hair cuts are at the top the list for happy moments. I am getting to where I do not eat a lot and my husband always cooks something he knows I love. God bless family and small things.
    I have found there can always be something to smile about though it may be a small thing it can make a huge difference to us.

  • Janet Plank moderator author
    3 weeks ago

    Pat02 you made my day. It’s always joyous when someone understands and that similar things help to make a person smile, such as grands and haircuts.

    It sounds like you have a wonderful and caring husband. Small things do make the world go round.
    Often it’s to hard for a person to see what’s right next to us, because a person too often is looking at a distance.
    I hope you have a breathe-easy day/night.

  • Janet Plank moderator author
    3 weeks ago

    Hi Josmar
    I’m sorry that you are struggling. The air makes a difference, hopefully you can get a bigger one or an a/c sometime soon.

    I am not familiar with the SOEMAC and did look it up. It seems that it’s in the UK now. I would talk with your doctor about this. He/she is the only one who knows your illness and would be able to advise you

    Where are you located?

    I hope that sleep comes easier for you and that it’s longer lasting. I hope too that you are able to see your doctor, who could possibly help you and answer questions for you.

    Please let us know how you are doing.

    Janet (author, site moderator)

  • Josmar
    3 weeks ago

    Since having COPD my greatest struggle is when I go to sleep. It is very very rare that I get a good night’s sleep. I think 4-5 hours is my average. We can’t afford to have air conditioning in our bedroom, so instead I use a small desk fan all the time when I sleep because it seems to help. Even with the fan blowing all night I still wake up every morning feeling tired and in pain. It’s been like this for years. I don’t use oxygen because about 6 months ago when I saw my pulmonogist, she did some computations and then told me I don’t need oxygen yet. However, lately I’ve come across some ads promoting SOEMAC for COPD sufferers. The reactions I’ve read all seem to approve it. As I said, we are not well-off but if it can help me with my sleep problem, I’d like to try it. Does it really work? Is it worth the money?

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